Workshops

Military Sexual Trauma among women and men veterans of Operation Iraq Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom is a major emerging issue for our time. The most widely type of trauma researched thus far is trauma in female veterans who experienced sexual assault (MST) while serving in the military. Despite recent and ongoing research, the study of MST is still in its infancy stage. This presentation will explore risk factors, prevalence, mental and physical consequences and implications for treatment.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Define the prevalence of Military Sexual Trauma among women veterans of OIF and OEF.
  2. Describe the risk factors associated with sexual assault.
  3. Explore many of the key points presently researched including mental health and physical health consequences.
  4. Discuss mental health treatment interventions with the strongest levels of empirical support including Prolonged Exposure Treatment and Cognitive Processing Therapy among others.

Presenter:DeCesare, Nancy

Sister Nancy DeCesare has over thirty years of experience working in the fields of administration, social work and teaching. As a frontline social worker on the streets of New York City, a supervisor, and executive director and now as an associate professor of Human Services at Chestnut Hill College, Philadelphia PA She holds both bachelors and masters in Social Work from Marywood University, and a Masters of Public Administration from the Robert F. Wagner School of Public Service. Sister received her PhD in Clinical Social Work from the Shirley M. Ehrenkraus School of Social work, New York University. She is a member of the National Association of Social Workers, the Academy of Certified Social Workers, and a Board Certified Diplomate in Clinical Social Work. She is a licensed clinical social worker in both New York and Pennsylvania.

Sister has received many honors for her work with marginalized populations including the National Jefferson Award, an award founded by Jackie Kennedy given for outstanding public service, the No Time to Lose Award, presented by the Governor of New York and the Beloved Award for her work with street children.

Sister is the former Executive Director of Boys Hope Girls Hope of New York, an international program for homeless youth. In addition, Sister is a grant writer, teacher and author. She has served on several boards including the Philadelphia Children’s Foundation and the Governor’s Advisory Board for People with Disabilities for the state of Pennsylvania.

Sister Nancy’s professional life has complemented her desire to make a difference. Her research centers on improving both personal and educational opportunities for young people. Her work in the areas of social policy, mental health and clinical counseling are notable. In 2010, Sister started The Soldiers Project for the State of Pennsylvania. The Soldiers Project provides services to veterans and their loved ones from the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts free of charge. It is part of the National program of The Soldiers Project. The Soldiers Project PA also provides ongoing continuing education opportunities about the psychological effects of war.  These trainings are open to the public, and free to members of The Soldiers Project. 

Date: Friday, September 26, 2014

Time: 8:30am Registration, Workshop 9am to 4pm

Location: Belmont Behavioral Health

Credits 6 CEU’s for PA Social Workers; MFT’s and PC’s and NJ Social Workers

$110.00

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According to Alfred Kasdushin, long considered the father of social work supervision, there are three components to effective social work supervision: administrative, educational and supportive. Supervisors must provide all three components to new and seasoned social workers in order to be an effective supervisor.

This training will address the various areas of educational supervision – how the supervisor teaches his or her supervisees what he or she needs to know to get the job done. This includes helping staff develop professionally, solve problems, develop self-awareness and giving feedback to the supervisee.

OBJECTIVES

At the end of this six hour training, participants will be able to:

  • Utilize the six principles of learning
  • Discuss the three stages of staff development and identify his/her own staff within this framework
  • Learn how to give constructive feedback
  • Identify supervisee resistance and how to help him/her develop self-awareness

Presenter: Allene Lyons, LCSW Lyons, Allene

Allene Lyons graduated from the University of Connecticut School of Social Work in 1974.  Her career has been spent in the mental health sector, working in a variety of settings with children and their families. For the past 20 years Allene’s career path has gone from Clinical Supervisor to Director to Regional Director of Behavioral Health for a number of agencies overseeing multiple programs. In addition, Allene has provided clinical trainings to a variety of agencies. Allene’s interest is in providing clinical supervision to graduate students and clinicians working towards their LCSW.

 

Date: Friday, October 17, 2014

Time: 8:30am Registration, Workshop: 9am to 4pm

Location: Belmont Center, 4200 Monument Road, Philadelphia, PA 19131

Credits: 6 CEU’s for PA Social Workers; MFT’s and PC’ s and NJ Social Workers

$110.00

RSVP by paying for the workshop on line below:

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Social work staff in many areas of practice often finds themselves working with clients who did not choose social work services and are very resistant to them. Required nevertheless to provide assistance, staff can become understandably frustrated and challenged by these resistant or sometimes quite hostile clients. Participants in this workshop will learn how to recognize clients’ “normal patterns of reactance” to involuntary social work and to develop successful service contracts that are honest and non-coercive, thereby affording the client a range of thoughtful, potential choices. The social worker’s effective use of language, ways of deescalating anger and the skill of reframing problematic issues are all illustrated, along with attitudes of genuine respect. Ethical considerations and social work values are carefully considered as well.

GOAL: Participants will learn to recognize and better understand clinically a variety of common reactant, resistant, and / or hostile behaviors of clients and how to engage such clients respectfully and effectively.

OBJECTIVES: To recognize specific types of reactance to involuntary social work.—To learn and to practice effective ways of speaking to such reactant hostility.—To identify the most common forms of “clinical resistance” (vs. “reactance”) and how to respond to these.—To learn and to practice four strategies for effective, ethical engagement of involuntary clients.—To understand and respond well to race, gender, age or religion, if they become “issues” for clients.

Presenter: Vic Compher Vic Compher

Vic Compher is a licensed, clinical social worker who has practiced for a number of years in child welfare, adult and aging, and hospice services. His workshops address such subjects as working with resistant and hostile clients, coping with secondary trauma when tragedy occurs on one’s caseload, understanding adult psychopathology, and supervising social workers and students. Among various articles and books he has written, Vic is the author of, “Family-Centered Practice: The Interactional Dance Beyond the Family System” (NY: Human Sciences/Plenum Press, 1989). He has produced and directed 3 films, including an intergenerational documentary called, “I Cannot Be Silent: Testimonies of Peacemaking”. His current and new documentary project, “Caregivers”, addresses the personal and professional impact upon helping professionals of their work with traumatic cases.

Date: Friday, October 31, 2014

Time: 8:30am Registration, Workshop 9am to 4pm

Location: Belmont Behavioral Health

Credits 6 CEU’s for PA Social Workers; MFT’s and PC’s and NJ Social Workers

$110.00

RSVP by paying for the workshop on-line below:

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SUMMARY

According to Alfred Kasdushin, long considered the father of social work supervision, there are three components to effective social work supervision: administrative, educational and supportive. Supervisors must provide all three components to new and seasoned social workers in order to be an effective supervisor.

This training will address the various areas of supportive supervision – how the supervisor motivates his or her staff, the use of empathy, secondary trauma and how it effects staff’s ability to provide services (including burnout), and recognizing and rewarding staff.

OBJECTIVES

At the end of this six hour training, participants will be able to:

  • Develop a positive work environment
  • Discuss the five modes of empathy and when to use each with staff
  • Discuss the characteristics of vicarious trauma and how to assist the worker in coping with it
  • Develop ways to reward staff for a job well doneLyons, Allene

Presenter: Allene Lyons, LCSW

Allene Lyons graduated from the University of Connecticut School of Social Work in 1974.  Her career has been spent in the mental health sector, working in a variety of settings with children and their families. For the past 20 years Allene’s career path has gone from Clinical Supervisor to Director to Regional Director of Behavioral Health for a number of agencies overseeing multiple programs. In addition, Allene has provided clinical trainings to a variety of agencies. Allene’s interest is in providing clinical supervision to graduate students and clinicians working towards their LCSW.

Date: Friday, November 14, 2014 – Time: 8:30am Registration, Workshop: 9am to 4pm

Location: Belmont Center, 4200 Monument Road, Philadelphia, PA 19131

Credits: 6 CEU’s for PA Social Workers; MFT’s and PC’ s and NJ Social Workers

$110.00

RSVP by paying for the workshop on line below:

Add to Cart